Macau vis-à-vis Manila: Architectural Splendor in Photos

If you paid attention during a high school world history class or during a discussion about empires rising and falling, odds are that you learned a lot about the Iberian Union between the Spanish and the Portuguese. At the same time, you most likely learned about the Spanish Empire and the Portuguese Empire and the vast, wealthy trade empires both nations built. The famous military leaders, the military victories and defeats, and even cultural traces like national languages are known to most, but one of the most interesting aspects of colonial rule I want to investigate is strikingly visible all over Macau and many parts of Manila: architecture.

Walking to Senado Square through the customs building.
Walking to Senado Square through the customs building.

In previous posts (some solely dedicated to architecture, and some not), I have mentioned the interesting nature iconic imagery that accompanies many of these old colonial structures as newer, more modern buildings spring up around them. In Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, high rises and office buildings stand next to crumbling (albeit beautiful) colonial structures, and those structures stand next to other well preserved colonial buildings. The contrast is fascinating and deserves its own post.

The nature of the Iberian Union and the close ties between the Portuguese and Spanish, though Catholicism and colonial architecture are a dominating presence as you walk through historic Macau and Intramuros, the famous walled city within metro Manila. There is one uniting factor between the two cities, even though they are thousands of miles apart: Spanish Baroque style architecture. This influence resonates from the gates of Intramuros to the walls of St. Paul’s.

The main impetus for me traveling to Macau for the first time over a year ago was rather simple. I wanted to play roulette at the famous Grand Lisboa Casino, eat some of the famous Portuguese egg tarts, and see the famous fountain at Senado Square, right in the heart of old Macau. As soon as I arrived, though, I was taken back by the fantastic job that Portuguese authorities (until 1999) and the current Chinese government have done with preserving and protecting the colonial architectural treasures that await in Macau. The fabulous parks and street signs instantly let you know that you are in a special place, unlike any other on Earth.

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Of course Senado Square is the most famous attraction, with its 16th Century tiled walkways and plazas, boasting images of sea creatures and boats within the intricate tile work. I thought the historic nature of the city would be limited to this touristy area, but I was happily mistaken. Almost as soon as one gets off of the bus at one of the casinos, the rich history of Macau becomes visible. The pastel pink governor’s mansion is visible across the lagoon from Macau Tower.

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As my friend and I made our way towards this beautiful building, we walked up more back alleys and found ourselves in a world of a past time. Tiled plazas were abound, as were nice walkways and statues. The dominating factor of it all, though, was the nature of the architecture. There were Catholic Churches everywhere. Nearby buildings borrowed from the Spanish Baroque style of architecture to help create a unique feel and flavor in the world’s most-densely populated city. It is quite a site to see Catholic nuns walking through the streets in China with a backdrop as elegant as the various Catholic Churches in the area. We haven’t even gotten to the most famous part of the Portuguese legacy in Macau: the ruins of St. Paul’s Cathedral.

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When one walks through Intramuros, similar sights and sounds follow you in a completely different environment than the one found in Macau. Ravaged by war, the colonial history of the city is still visible, but only in small places like Intramuros.

Once you pass through the gates to the city, a whole new world comes to life. Children bustle on the cobblestone streets and in the back alleys while horse-drawn carriages carry tourists from one place to another in the Spanish-era fortification. Ruins of old shops, homes, and stores have been turned into museums and antique shops while the plazas, fountains, and monuments to previous leaders and religious figures are kept largely in tact. Pastel-colored buildings adorned with Spanish names and large cast-iron gates represent what life was like during another era. I did not find it difficult to imagine myself walking down these streets prior to the Spanish-American War.

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As you realize you are inside of a massive walled city and earthwork fortification, something else becomes very clear: Manila was a very important and strategic location for the Spanish Empire. Overlooking various waterways and the Pacific Ocean, there was a reason why the Spanish, Americans, and Japanese all coveted Manila at different points in history. These kinds of views and outlook points are very similar to those one can observe in Macau, adjacent to the Ruins of St. Paul’s Cathedral.

View from Fort Santiago
View from Fort Santiago

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The Portuguese built a sizable and imposing fort at the top of the ridge next to St. Paul’s centuries ago and this fort helped stave off a formidable Dutch invasion centuries ago. Much like in Manila, the guns and soldiers are long gone but the fort symbolizes the military importance of a port city to trading giants. In Manila, forts look out over some of the poorer areas of the city, but in Macau there are some spectacular views of the Grand Lisboa Casino.

Cannons overlook the Grand Lisboa Casino in Macau.
Cannons overlook the Grand Lisboa Casino in Macau.

These architectural styles are fantastic, but the true beauty in Manila and Macanese architecture rest in the Catholic Churches and other places of worship that dot the respective cities. In Macau, there are various churches and cathedrals, which, with their bright exteriors and somewhat plain interiors, show off the importance of Catholicism while being somewhat modes in their construction. At the same time, the Baroque style dominates their exteriors with concrete sculptures, high rooflines, and ornate woodwork. The true beauty in Macau rests with the world famous St. Paul’s ruins. A truly baroque building, the stonework and remaining elements of this church make one wonder, in awe, bout how it would have looked in its prime before it was destroyed by a fire.

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Manila’s lavishly painted San Agustin Church, along with the Manila Cathedral provide a similar feel for the Catholic influence over the largest city in the Philippines. Dominating stone facades and interiors show the Spanish Baroque-influenced architectural similarities, as well.

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Had it not been for World War II’s destruction of much of Manila, I often wonder what the rest of the city would look like, and whether or not many of its historic and colonial structures would have been preserved. While the most famous elements of Macau’s colonial architecture rests on the northern island, a trip to the southern island and its town, called Taipa, reveals even more interesting colonial architecture. Entire streets of colonial homes and businesses give this part of Macau a very unique feel, even though it is very close to the center of the casino industry. The coolest part about going to Taipa at this time of year was seeing the Lusophone Festival in full swing and sampling some Portuguese and Macanese delights as I walked through the streets of the historic port city.

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When traveling, especially in Asia, where colonial outposts, forts, and other remnants of empire exist, it is important to take some time out of your travel to take in the architecture and try to understand the influences and underlying causes to these buildings and why they are there in the first place. I was surprised by how similar Macau and Manila were, architecturally speaking. I will be visiting a former Dutch garrison in Taiwan in a few weeks and look forward to seeing my first piece of the former Dutch East India Company.

In the coming days, I will post another article documenting some of the architecture I witnessed in Malaysia, specifically Kuala Lumpur, and how seeing that British architecture inspired me to embark on my most daring and exotic trip yet: Burma.

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All Photos are Copyright Erik Jacobs, Erik Abroad (c) 2013 – Present

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Why Postcards Matter

Do you remember what it was like before e-mail and text messaging when you were younger and rushed home to check the mailbox or when out to the mailbox for your parents to check if there was any mail? I am 23 years old and I sure remember that. Of course I never received bills at that time, but it was always a rush to receive a letter and open it with a sense of anticipation. Every time I got mail or a postcard, a few questions always raced through my head: From whom did the letter come? What was inside the letter? Why did they even send me a letter?

When I was younger (and to this day) I also get similar feelings when I am posting mail and slipping it into the mailbox (all the while hoping it either a) arrives at its intended destination or b) wondering how long it would take to arrive in the recipient’s hands.

I will also readily admit that I like the taste of the seal on envelopes and even the taste of the old-school lickable stamps. I think there is something uniquely human intrenched within each of us that wants to send a real letter (or post card) instead of a text message or e-mail, and that is why I am writing this article.

Whenever I set off on international travel or domestic travel to famous or interesting destinations far from my hometown (in the United States) or in my current base (Kobe, Japan) there are a few things that I must take with me. First of all, my camera and my phone (for GPS) absolutely must come. Secondly, my passport comes along. The third thing I bring with me is a small notebook in which I keep with the addresses of my close family, friends, and a few other people with whom I exchange travel correspondence via snail mail. Other than that, all other things (except toothpaste and deodorant) are either optional or can be acquired on-site if there truly is a need.

I am sure many people think the concept of carrying an address book or list of addresses with me on my travels is quite odd, but I will explain why it is so important and overlooked. Many times when we travel, getting caught up in the moment of snapping the perfect photograph, practicing our language skills, sampling local street food, or just hustling from point A to point B allows us to escape from our troubles with work, stress, relationships, etc. That stress relief is a great thing, but one of the most important aspects of travel (at least to me) is sharing the experience with our loved ones, our friends, and others that may have an interest in our travels or experiences. Anyone can take five seconds and fire off an e-mail saying they are in such-and-such city and they are thinking of you. Even more people can take two seconds to send a text message and let their friends know they will be out of touch for a while.

Sending a post card to convey your thoughts, feelings, and emotions about your travels takes time, energy, and thought. Not everyone is willing to expend the energy to actually make a personal connection with people when you are out on the road. I find this interaction one of the best ways to truly enjoy travel and take in everything that may have flown over your head or passed by your eyes on a high-paced trip.

I always try to send postcards from interesting places when I travel. Nothing beats the response I get from people that did not know I was traveling. Receiving a postcard from somewhere like Seoul or Busan, South Korea, Kyoto, Japan, or Quebec City, Canada, truly made their day and sparked a genuine interest in travel. Their responses always focused on how kind it was to take the time to write the card and share what was happening at that moment with them. Those on the receiving end of the card really enjoy receiving the card, but the whole act of writing the card can be rewarding in itself. This came to fruition for me for the first time on Saturday  when I was writing cards to my family amidst controlled chaos in Senado Square, Macau.

My friend and I had settled down near the fountain in the middle of the tiled plaza to sample some San Miguel beer (famous Hong Kong/Macau drink) and just take in some sights and sounds when I remembered I had a few postcards to send back home. This triggered an interesting journey where I had to go to a stamp vending machine to get some stamps for my recently purchased cards due to the post office being closed on Saturday. Once we had settled back down at the Square, I finally had the chance to take in and gather all of my thoughts and transfer them to the old postcards I had purchased in one of Macau’s back alley. The most challenging thing about the whole process was figuring how much saliva to put on the stamp to make sure it would stay on the card! While the message itself would not be instantaneous, the true message and emotion of that day will certainly be evident when my family receives those cards. Everything from the cantina bar song playing in the background at the plaza to the architecture of the square to the crookedness of the lickable stamp should come alive when the recipients receive their cards in the next few days. When they read that card, see the foreign stamps, and know it was actually written where the stamp says it was, I know they will start thinking about the destination and what it is like.

I like to send handwritten letters, but the postcard will always have a special place in my heart. It helps you gather your thoughts and helps those you love truly understand what your travels meant to you at the time you wrote that card. Who knows? Maybe your card will inspire your family and friends to go somewhere, someday. I know when my parents received a card from the Turks and Caicos several years ago, my mind has been set on going there ever since.

Just remember this: The thought REALLY does count.

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Mailing a card from near Senado Square, Macau. © Erik Jacobs, 2013. erikabroad.com

To make a long story short, take a few minutes out of your trip to send a postcard to your friends and family. It will mean more to them than you can ever imagine. You might even enjoy gathering your thoughts for a few minutes.

Postcards still matter.

Why Macau is as Good as Hong Kong

For anyone who has never been to the two Special Administrative Regions in China, what I am about to say could sounds shocking to some. The same could also be said by those of you that have been to Hong Kong and Macau. I am going to say it anyway, though. I liked visiting Macau as much as I liked visiting Hong Kong last week. Both cities are great, but for very different reasons. The fusion of European and Chinese history and architecture, the different parts of the island and accompanying lifestyles, and the amazing photographic opportunities on the streets highlight some of the reasons why I loved my time in Macau. 

The whole day started off bright and early as my friend and I left our hotel in Hong Kong at 5:15 AM to start the walk from the Admiralty Station area to make it to Hong Kong – Macau Ferry Terminal in time for a customs check before our 7:00AM departure. The sun still had not risen and this offered a unique look over to Kowloon across Victoria Harbor. Image

After the most cursory of all security checks (literally presenting a passport and walking through a line without metal detector check or bag inspection), we were aboard the TurboJET ferry with an 8:15 arrival time in the former Portuguese colony. As the boat swayed at the dock in Hong Kong, I worried about sea sickness, but that fear did not come to fruition. Nearly as soon as we exited Victoria Harbor and began passing through the many smaller Hong Kong islands, the easy and smooth ocean lulled me to sleep. 

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After dealing with some pushy mainland Chinese at the immigration stop in Macau, we were through but there was one big problem: no currency exchange desks or information desks were open. It sure was weird to see Portuguese on a sign in Asia. I had read in several places that you could literally travel through all of Macau for free on casino busses, but we wanted to have a map to make sure we knew where we were going. After getting our map, we found out the worst-kept secret in Macau was true: you can travel virtually anywhere on the island, for free, on a casino shuttle bus. We boarded the shuttle bus to the Wynn to position ourselves for a morning and afternoon traversing the famous Portuguese parts of town. 

After a brief taste of the opulence and wealth that pervades Macau inside the shopping areas at the Wynn and on the casino floor, we began our walk around Nam Van Lake (past the Grand Lisboa) towards the government house to start our journey. Almost as soon as we arrived, I was enthralled with how well the Chinese had preserved the Portuguese and European architecture in Macau. Unlike Hong Kong, many of the older buildings from colonial rule were still in tact and vibrant. The colors on the administrative government building are something you will have to see to believe. I felt like I was somewhere in the middle of a Caribbean colony. It was odd to see a Chinese flag atop this building, but the colors were so vibrant.  Image

 

After a few more photos of the surrounding gardens and lotus pond, my friend and continued onward to the famous St.Lawrence Church where I witnessed something you could only find in Macau.

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Amidst the bustle of mopeds and motorcycles on every corner, a Catholic nun walked down the street with several other people. Here is a photo of that unforgettable moment.Image

You could never capture a moment like this in Hong Kong. The fusion of East and West was so evident outside of St. Lawrence Church. I loved watching the bicycles and motorcycles make the hard left turn in front of the church to continue down some more narrow streets where other bikes and pedestrians waited. Here is a shot of the area surrounding St. Lawrence Church. Image 

The sounds of a lively colonial city still emenated as we walked up the tiled slopes of this part of Macau with our sights set on finding Senado Square and then taking the famous walk through Macau to the ruins of St. Paul’s Cathedral. Fortunately for us, we were sidetracked and encountered even more mosaic-covered plazas and beautiful churches along our meandering route. 

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As we walked through more cobblestoned streets where Asian-style architecture was right next to European architecture, I fell more in love with Macau as I took each passing step. Originally my friend and I had planned this trip to Macau as a nice excursion to gamble a bit and check out the view from Macau Tower, but we quickly realized that we needed to spend an entire day making our way through the “other part” of the city, away from all of the glitz on the south side of the island. It was a great choice and one I will never regret. Over time, the number of tourists and other people picked up and we knew we were nearing the famed Senado Square in the heart of Macau’s Portuguese-influenced area. Just like that, the iconic mosaic-tiled square was upon us. As if it was a scene from a movie, we entered Senado Square as a band on the street played the song from the Star Wars cantina bar and here is what we saw. Everything from the teeming energy on the square to the architecture made me think I had been transported to Europe. It was impossible to believe that we were seated in China. I wished I had a time machine to go back to the mid-19th Century or the early 20th Century to see this location in its colonial heyday. Image 

Down on the square, my friend and I even ran into one of our friends who lives in Japan by mere coincidence. The world is such a small place. 

From Senado Square, my friend and I navigated through the quintessential Asian street market to make it up to St. Paul’s ruins. As bartering for a fresh Portuguese egg tart happened on the left, more negotiating over the price of famous pork happened on my right. A couple tried to push their newborn up the hill in a stiller, and I saw a Dairy Queen store and Nike outlet near the end of the passageway. This controlled chaos is one more reason why I loved this walk through old Macau. European streets were dominated by some of the best street food in all of Asia.

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As soon as this chaos broke, the reason why we began this journey appeared on the horizon: the ruins of the beautiful St. Paul’s Cathedral, destroyed by fire centuries ago. The scene was beautiful. An immaculately constructed Catholic facade sits atop several flights of stairs in the middle of the bustling Asian market. Behind it all, you can see the high rise buildings of new Macau. I only wished that I could have seen this church before its destruction. At that moment, the sun broke through the crowds and offered up an even better view of the ruins. At that moment, I was convinced that Macau would continue to be one of my favorite travel destinations– and a place I would want to see again in the future. As much as I loved Hong Kong, I did not encounter these types of cultural treasures during my two days walking the streets of China’s other Special Administrative Region.

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My friend and I did not stop there. We visited the fort adjacent to St. Paul’s to see another Portuguese legacy in this part of the city. The key component that helped the Portuguese stave off a Dutch invasion  in 1622, Fortaleza do Monte offered more stunning views of the Macanese skyline and helped emphasize the unique fusion of East and West, new and old, that Macau has to offer to even the historical novice or casual day traveler. 

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In between a stop at the Grand Lisboa and taking in a show at another casino, my friend and I also ventured to Taipa to see some more colonial sites and take the chance to sample some Macanese and Portuguese food on the streets. As well preserved as the Senado Square district was, I thought Taipa was even more well preserved. Whole blocks were painted to period colors. Colonial artwork and buildings dominated the landscape. There were even numerous Portuguese restaurants lining the streets. This type of neighborhood is another site you would not be able to find in Hong Kong because of the development and expansion the city saw since the change in economic policy in the 1970s. We even stumbled upon a Lusophonic festival in this part of the city.

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Of course a day in Macau is not complete without a trip to the Grand Lisboa to gamble and a trip to Taipa Island to see a show, but I wanted to focus this post on all of the unique historical sites that Macau has to offer, making it one of the most interesting and memorable places I have ever visited. Growing up close to Gettysburg, Washington, DC, Antietam, and Harper’s Ferry, I have always had a deep appreciation for history and historical preservation. When I came to Macao, I expected much of Portuguese colonial legacy to be eliminated for a host of reasons, but I was pleasantly surprised to see much of it in tact, preserved for future generations to appreciate. Something about the cobblestone, the mosaics, the buildings, and prevalent appearance of Portuguese give the world’s most densely populated city a different vibe. This fusion of cultures, languages, foods, and architecture makes Macau a photogenic city with so many unique experiences around each corner. I loved Macau for very different reasons than why I loved Hong Kong, but it is a very worthwhile destination in the region. I went to Macau skeptical about how good of a place the island would be, but I left knowing it was an amazing experience that I will never forget.   I will put a post in the future about how nice the casinos and Macau Tower were, but this post is dedicated to why Macau is as good as Hong Kong and why any traveler to Hong Kong has to take at least a day trip to Macau if they have the time. It is an unforgettable destination. 

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Chess, Cheers, and Chinese in Macau

Chess, Cheers, and Chinese in Macau

Chinese men laugh, smoke, drink, and talk as they play Chinese Chess in a park in Macau on November 2, 2013. (c) Erik Jacobs

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Pure Hong Kong

Pure Hong Kong

I have returned from Hong Kong and will have extensive posts about my time in Hong Kong and Macau in the coming days, but needed to share this photo of the famed Nathan Street before I go to bed and prepare for work tomorrow. I loved everything about Hong Kong from the glitz and glamor in the shopping districts to the street food and the Star Ferry, but taking in the local sounds was also amazing. Take a moment and be taken into the heart of Hong Kong.

Mysterious Macau

I will admit that I knew virtually nothing about Macau before my friend and I decided to take a day excursion during our stay in Hong Kong to the former Portuguese colony. Sure, I knew about the casinos, the gambling, and St. Paul’s ruins, but other than that, I knew virtually nothing. I must say that the more I read about Macau and its unique blend of East and West (the Portuguese were there for much longer than the British were in Hong Kong), the more I look forward to visiting the world’s most-densly-populated city. 

As someone who studied and analyzed Western influences into the East, colonies, and international trade, Macau seems like it is going to be an unforgettable trip. Unlike anywhere else in Asia, at least according to the photos I have seen, it appears as if European architecture and influence has been remarkably preserved. Everything from St. Paul’s ruins to the other Catholic churches that still stand to Senate Square appears to be in immaculate shape. I certainly look forward to trying some Portuguese food and enjoying an egg tart or two as I stroll through the Macanese streets in a few days. It’s just not religious and cultural history that sets Macau apart from the rest; military history is also in this city! A fort used to repel a Dutch invasion attempt hundreds of years ago still stands and will be one of the first things I visit in Macau. As someone who grew up within a stone’s throw of Gettysburg, nothing is more interesting than military history. 

From those spots, we will certainly go to Macau Tower and then make our way to the casinos and eventually to take in the world-famous House of the Dancing Water in the evening, but I am looking forward to taking in all of the unique historical and cultural history that only Macau has to offer. 

The Elusive Hong Kong

Ever since I was a young boy, I have dreamed of going to Hong Kong to see everything the city has to offer. I will never forget the first time I opened up an atlas in elementary school and began to peruse through the interesting and obscure pages of the book. My love of maps started early on as a child when I had a United States placemat at home and quickly translated into my love atlases (and three consecutive school Geography Bee championships). 

I will never forget the first time I stumbled across this far off British city located in the heart of China. Its name was Hong Kong. From the first second I saw (U.K.) next to this city, I was instantly intrigued and wanted to find more about why a British city was in the middle of China, how long it had been there, and what its purpose was. As fate would have it, the city was not British much longer after I made my discovery, but my desire to travel there was set in stone from that very moment. Would they speak English? Where would people drive? What kind of food do they eat in Hong Kong? — All common questions that came to mind for me. 

I even wanted to know if the wall-sized photo from the Port of Hong Kong that hung at the local China Buffett was real or not!

This nascent interest came to a head for me during one of my final semesters in college when I wrote one of my Honors papers on the positive impact of British rule and British Common Law in Hong Kong. The fascinating reading about how Hong Kong came under British control, the conflicts surrounding Hong Kong, etc. all intrigued me, but one factor stuck out the most: Hong Kong was capitalist while China was (and still is) a Communist nation. Twenty some pages later, I thought I had all of my questions answered,  but I knew the only way to truly understand it would be to see it in person. From where I typed that paper in North PHiladelphia, I knew I would not be roaming the streets of Hong Kong anytime soon, let alone within 18 months of when that paper was submitted. 

The title of this post is “The Elusive Hong Kong,” There is a very good reason why I chose this title as opposed to others that could fit Hong Kong or the purpose of what my trip in a more apt way. In 2011, I was living in Tokyo as a study abroad student at an American university and I was truly enjoying my time on the bustling streets of the world’s largest city. Everything from making new friends to studying a new language, and exploring Japan made life amazing. I aw just getting in to the hang of things after about two months a t my university when the horrific Great Tohoku Earthquake struck Japan on Friday, March 11, 2011. 

Immediately following news of the earthquake, tsunami, and radiation leaks in Japan, my family and I, the US Embassy, and other outlets were concerned about how some American students in Tokyo were going to get home. FOllowing several sleepless and tense nights, my parents and I determined that I would come home on March 15th, a mere four days after the earthquake. Fortunately everything worked out fine for my return home, but something peculiar happened which was quite a surprise to me: following a day-long hibernation back on the East Coast I logged into Facebook only to find that many of my friends were checking into various places in Hong Kong. As a matter of fact, all of these people were at my university when I decided to leave. 

It instantly hit me that the US State Department ordered the kids home and my university helped work out some sort of flight back to the Untied States that involved a layover in Hong Kong. Sure, I was happy to be home, but I was so disappointed that I missed out on the chance to explore Hong Kong with some of my newest friends. I never thought I would get the opportunity to come back to Asia, let alone Hong Kong. 

Things have changed quite a bit and now I live in Asia and will be traveling to Hong Kong on Friday. I am so excited for this experience and cannot wait to see if my preconceptions about Hong Kong, the things I have learned from my research, and other suppositions about (what one of my friends called one of the world’s “Three Great Cities”) Hong Kong will be true or false. Will the food be amazing? Will people readily speak English on the streets? How beautiful will Victoria Peak be at night? Those questions, and others like them, are all on my mind as I finish up this post.

 Lest I forget Macau. Similar questions about this Portuguese outpost are swirling through my head. I will be going there on Saturday.

Maybe I play the British Grenadiers March and the Royal Hong Kong Police Force Anthem before I depart to set the mood for this whole trip. 

I cannot wait to go to the elusive Hong Kong and check this city off my bucket list. 

Preparing for Another Adventure

Do you remember the first time you read about some far away land in your elementary school or middle school textbooks? Do you remember the sense of adventure, urgency, and desire to go there that came over you when you read about this place or had a discussion about it when you were a toddler? I remember my first encounter with Hong Kong and Macau very well. 

From a young age, I have always been fascinated with maps (I won the geography bee at my junior high school in eighth and ninth grades.) and from this love came my interest in the British Empire. The first time I studied a map and saw (UK) next to this tiny city in China, my interest was sparked and my mind started to inquire and wonder what this place was, why it was in China, and if it really was a part of the United Kingdom. A few searches on the CIA World Factbook website later, I was in the midst of a conversation about Hong Kong with one of my elementary school teachers. He also mentioned a place named Macau which was similar, being Portuguese, and right across the bay from Hong Kong. 

His descriptions of the importance of trade and maritime influence, the fusion of the Eastern World and the Western World, and how much British culture and the English language had helped shape and mold Hong Kong were fascinating. This discussion, coupled with more map studies made me want to go to Hong Kong and Macau. That itch has been with me ever since. 

I had a course during my next-to-last semester in college about international relations and I decided to do a historical analysis of the positive impacts of British rule in Hong Kong. It aws fascinating to learn about the changes in the colony following the 1945 Japanese Occupation and how the Brathwaite and company opened up Hong Kong’s economy in the 1970s. This unique place where the Western world meets the Far East and the two blend together has to be as awesome in real life as it seems in the books and on the television, right? There is always the skyline, too. 

This dream of going to Hong Kong will soon be a reality, and a friend and I will be taking full advantage of a long weekend in November to hop on a plane from Osaka to Hong Kong. We will be certain to spend a day in Macau, as well, taking in the sites from Macau Tower to the famous St. Paul’s ruins and the Portuguese architecture. 

I must say that I was thrilled to have the chance to go to South Korea to met friends and take on another strange, foreign country. That being said, I am absolutely unabashedly excited to go to Hong Kong and see if the city with the high buildings, the British influence, and the amazing harbor that I saw each time I went to the China Buffet as a kid is everything I had imagined it to be. 

Now is the most fun part of traveling: planning where to go, what to do, which restaurants and bars to visit, and of course, making sure our cameras are in working order. Victoria’s Peak is the first place I will go in the evening while in Hong Kong. 

Have you ever been to Hong Kong or Macau? Any suggestions are greatly appreciated. 

 

Thanks!